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What is an assistance animal?

Assistance animals can make a profound difference in the lives of people with disabilities. FunHaus Factory supports the important work of these animals and their role in enabling people with disabilities to access

FunHaus Factory is striving to be a diverse and inclusive site that is able to offer an amazing experience to all of our guests. We thank you for your support in our efforts to provide a safe and positive experience for you, our guests and our people.

FunHaus Factory aims to serve our community and will make every effort to safely accommodate individuals who are accompanied by an assistance animal on site. FunHaus Factory will assist guests who require assistance animals to access areas and facilities on site where guests are permitted.

Assistance Animals

(An assistance animal (which is also commonly referred to as a service animal) is defined under the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Cth) as a dog or other animal that:

  1. Is accredited under law to assist a person with a disability to alleviate the effect of the disability;
  2. Is trained by an accredited training organization prescribed by the regulations; and
  3. Meets the standards of hygiene and behavior that are appropriate for an animal in a public place.

There are several other types of animals which do not meet the legal definition and are not considered ‘assistance animals’ including companion, emotional support, therapy, facility and visitation animals. The FunHaus Factory recognises the service and supporting role that these animals have in an individual’s life and will assess and make reasonable adjustments for any individual requests that it receives.

A non-assistance dog will require a training report for behavioural assurance to be submitted as part of the approval process. Requests and supporting documentation will be required prior to showing up via contacting assistance@funhausfactory.org.au

FunHaus Factory is entitled to request reasonable proof that your animal is a genuine assistance animal. This means proof:

  • that you have a disability;
  • that your animal has been trained to alleviate the effect of the disability; and
  • that your animal is trained to meet standards of hygiene and behaviour appropriate for an animal in a public place.
  • ID card to show your ‘accreditation’ under a state Act, such as the GHAD Act09,
  • Importantly, a person with a disability has the right to train their own assistance animal so long as they can provide proof that that training means the animal meets the definition of an assistance animal (see What is an assistance animal?).

Registration as an assistance animal under the Companion Animals Act 1998 does not necessarily provide proof the animal is an assistance animal for the purposes of entering a public place or public transport.

Social Behaviour and Expectations

Whilst attending the FunHaus Factory all animals will:

  1. meet the standards of hygiene, including toileting
  2. demonstrate social behaviour that is neither unruly nor aggressive
  3. be under continuous effective control by their owner or handler
  4. not be left unattended or tethered

Animal Owner/Handler Responsibilities

The service and assistance animal owner/handler is responsible for:

  1. Managing the hygiene and behaviour of the animal
  2. Ensuring the animal remains under continuous effective control
  3. Providing the FunHaus Factory evidence of service animal accreditation or accredited in-training 
  4. Providing evidence for the requirement of a non-assistance animal. A non-assistance dog will require a training report for behavioural assurance to be submitted as part of the approval process

CUSTOMERS CONCERNED ABOUT HAVING ANIMALS IN THE VENUE

Dogs are the most common assistance animal, sometimes referred to as ‘service animals’. These include guide dogs,  hearing dogs and psychiatric service dogs.

It is important that members of the public do not pat or distract assistance dogs unless permitted by the owner.

Owners of assistance animals have full public access rights. This means certified assistance animals are permitted to accompany their owner where ever members of the public are allowed to go. This includes on all forms of public transport. The only exceptions may be areas where there is a public health risk. It is illegal to discriminate against anyone who is reliant on an assistance animal by denying them full public access rights. View the Disability Discrimination Act 1992.

An assistance animal is legally defined under commonwealth legislation as a dog or other animal ;


a) accredited under a law of a State or Territory that provides for the accreditation of animals trained to assist a persons with a disability to alleviate the effect of the disability; or
b) accredited by an animal training organisation prescribed by the regulations for the purposes of this paragraph; or
c) trained:
      i) to assist a person with a disability to alleviate the effect of the disability; and
      ii) to meet standards of hygiene and behaviour that are appropriate for an animal in a public place.

Guide dogs – Appropriate harness or medallion and identification passport

Hearing dogs – Appropriate harness or medallion and identification passport

MindDogs – MindDog pass and vest

Resources and Contacts

Transport for NSW – access to public transport for assistance animals
Ph:   131 500

NSW Office of Local Government – Assistance Animals 
Ph:   02 4428 4100 
Email:   olg@olg.nsw.gov.au

MindDog
Email:   info@minddog.org.au

Assistance Dogs Australia
Ph:  1800 688 364
Email:   info@assistancedogs.org.au

Guide Dogs Australia
Ph:  1800 484 333
Email:   info@guidedogs.asn.au

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